Ontario Drivers Now Require Headsets for Car Phone Use – Mobile Fleets Need Headset Procurement

On April 22nd, 2009 Ontario’s Bill 118 passed into law. The bill requires drivers to use cell phones using hands free methods such as Bluetooth headsets. If you try to use your phone in one hand while driving you can face a $500 fine. If you cause an accident in the process, using your phone will be considered to be evidence against you in careless driving prosecutions.

The law doesn’t just apply to cell phones, but using any handheld device with a display screen in any context but hands free use. This includes iPods and many GPS devices. You can still use these if they’re in hands free mode, but even holding them without actively using them can get you in trouble.

Bill 118 follows a trend in several jurisdictions to crack down on distracting mobile device use. This may improve road safety but for many businesses, the whole point of a cellular phone fleet is to enable use on the road. As a result, companies that need this capability must upgrade to hands free tools like headsets, and cell phone plans that permit easy hands free use.

This is a definite cellular expense management issue. Your price per headset and modified plans could add a substantial amount to your costs unless you use a telecom expense management provider with expertise in both cell phone plans and cellular hardware procurement. Fortunately for us at GILL Technologies, we have always maintained a strong emphasis on both plans and hardware, so we’re able to outfit our clients’ employees with a complete hands free solution at reduced costs. Telecom cost audits aren’t just about plans – they’re about the total cost to use your handsets.

Even if you don’t live in Ontario you should consider upgrading your mobile fleet to hands free use. More and more jurisdictions in the US, Canada and beyond are passing similar laws, and it wouldn’t be a stretch to say that in the near future, laws like this will be the rule almost everywhere. Besides, these laws get passed for a reason: Hands free use on the road really is safer, and we encourage everyone to consider the option.