Travel Saver Options

Mobile Plan Management with Travel Saver Options

Business trips are nothing new, and have long been a part of how we do business.  Cell phones have become an integral part of our business too… but these two realities of business when combined have for too long been a huge expense with few options for relief.

 

Large company’s with fleets of employees travelling around the world on their behalf  have had to pay upwards of $4 per minute for using their phone when outside of their country. Bills for upwards of $1,500 would not be uncommon for making and receiving calls while travelling.

 

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Horror Story of the Week: Roaming Issues While Traveling Abroad

Roaming Mishaps While Traveling Abroad – What Now?

smartphone speed mobile management

In your company, there are likely several employees who have or will need to travel abroad for work-related reasons. In all likelihood, they will need to take their company cell phone in order to take calls, receive emails and continue on with regular business while they are gone. In terms of mobile device management, this is generally  an issue-free occurrence, but what do you do if this happens:

 

You have a user who is travelling abroad, and soon after they were scheduled to land,  you receive a frantic email from them. Their phone does not work.  They are not able to make or receive any calls from where they are, and they have to be on an important conference call shortly which they cannot miss. 

 

You give the carrier a call to see if everything seems good on their end, and the rep you speak with tells you [Read more…]

Text Messaging – Are you covered?

Did you notice any increased charges on your mobile billing lately?

 

Text messaging has gotten a little more expensive on two of the big Canadian three.

Bell Mobility and Rogers Wireless have now begun to charge $0.20 for text messaging outside of a text plan.

That means anyone who does not have text messaging included with their cell phone plan or as an added feature, or anyone who exceeds their number of allowed sent messages will be paying $0.20 for each text message.

 

This adds up quickly! [Read more…]

Great Cell Phone for Seniors – Doro PhoneEasy

A Mobile Device easy enough for anyone to use!

This little phone is geared primarily for seniors and has been getting great reviews!

 

The Doro PhoneEasy simply put – is a simple to use mobile device packed full of great features – so simple that anyone can use it!

In Canada – the Doro cell phone is offered on the Rogers Wireless Network.

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BlackBerry Replacement Under Warranty Through Rogers!

Does Your BlackBerry Need Warranty Servicing? 

Having your BlackBerry break down on you is not an ideal situation to be in!

 

We know – You rely on your BlackBerry everyday for multiple functions, and just can’t go with out it. So Now What? What will you do and how will you get along without your BlackBerry while it’s in for service? 

 

Did you know that if your unit is still under warranty, the replacement process is fairly painless? What a relief!  [Read more…]

10 Simple Steps to Blackberry Email Set Up to BIS Server

Blackberry Email Setup to BIS Server

Have you been given the frustrating task to set up blackberry email to a BIS Server or create a blackberry login? Have you been told by the carrier, that what was once available through their website, a channel to complete the setup, was no longer offered as Blackberry was no longer permitting the carrier to provide this. Whether we believe this or not, it certainly has caused allot of challenges for users.  The alternative for this, is setting up via the Blackberry itself, which can be challenging all on its own. So we cornered our ClientCare Team to give us the steps to make it happen in an easy step by step process. Below are 10 simple steps that as of this posting have seemed to do it for most users. Hope this helps.

 
How to set up email on Blackberry and create a Web Login from your Blackberry phone:

1. Push the Blackberry key to bring up the menu and go to Set up. Then Email Set up/ Email Accounts. It will connect to the service.
2. Read and agree to the Blackberry Service Agreement.
3. When it brings up the email options ( Yahoo, Gmail, etc. ) go to Other
4. Enter the Email and Password of your email account
      >You may get a message “ Invalid email address or Password. Verify your email address and password. If the error persists please contact…..” Hit  OK and it should bring up a link “ I will provide email settings”
5. Make sure the POP/IMAP option is hilighted, confirm the email address and password. Enter you email server ( get this from your IT Manager or email provider ) and the username for the server  then hit continue
6. The next screen should be a confirmation screen, saying that the set up is complete. You should start receiving emails on the phone.

 

not quite done though….
 
7. Return to the setup screen and got back in to the email setup up. You should see the email that you just set up. Hit the Blackberry key to bring up the full menu, then select “Create User name” . You will get a screen advising you that this is a permanent change and the steps required. Hit Continue.
8. This will bring up the login screen. Enter a user name and password
9. You will have to validate the email account by putting the email password in again. Once done you should get a screen saying that the password was successfully validated.
10. The email is now successfully set up and you can exit out of the set up screen. Take a break you’ve earned it!
 

Now for fun – watch the video – which has a mind blowing statistic at the end. We think you’ll like it. Enjoy and don’t forget to subscribe to our blog for weekly Tip of the Week Updates!

 

 

 

 

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How to decide between a new Blackberry and the iPhone for your Business

This is a great question, especially with the growing popularity of the iPhone (even among enterprise) and the current market captured by the Blackberry. There are a couple of things to consider when making this important decision, whether you’re jumping ship or a newbie to the smart phone arena. I’ve divided the comparison into two categories, first functionality,
and second cost, certainly not in any order of importance as there is weight for both. But before we look at these two comparisons, why is it such an important decision? Well simply put, your phone has become a critical part of how you do business. With the added capabilities and features coming into play it is becoming even more important all the time.

Functionality:

So with functionality becoming increasingly important, this is where BlackBerry tends to be playing catch-up. Try a Google search on the two devices searching for applications and you quickly see a major short fall on BlackBerry. I find as a BlackBerry user myself looking to the iPhone or an Android as a potential solution to maximizing efficiency. That after all is what the functionality is for. To make my life more efficient, provide better service and give me more time to focus on other things. So as I dive into the applications on the BlackBerry to increase efficiency I am continuously

apple-iphone

running into brick walls. For example through my Google account I want to be able to access and sync my Gmail account. At best the Google application has many limitations. First syncing is not a true sync, such as draft emails don’t appear on my desktop until sent. The calendar function on the device is rudimentary at best. The ability to add a simple appointment for a specific time with details is impossible to date. Other functionalities such as Twitter applications put the device into cardiac arrest. Now with all this being said I am not looking for a device to tell me what tip I should leave, this I can handle. I’m speaking of everyday functions that keep me connected with my team, my customers, and on task. Unless I stay focused in my exchange environment (which is losing its attraction all the time) BlackBerry is losing its appeal.

Cost:

Once we get by the sticker shock of the hardware pricing – realizing these devices are so much more than just a phone – these devices are going to give me back time and efficiency, then we have the cost of operation to consider. This is where we see a big difference through our telecom cost audit and mobile management services on Tele-Watch. There is no doubt that these same wonderful applications that are increasing efficiencies are also driving up data costs to the carrier and soon if not already to the end clients. The iPhone in techy terms – is a pig – that’s a technical term. Now with talk of carriers taking away unlimited data in the US, and none really available (when you read the fine print) in Canada, this is a major concern. With BlackBerry costs fairly fixed and their data usage light, I at least know my costs and they are consistent.

With BlackBerry racing to catch up on applications, I will hold temporarily and see if the applications I need to be more efficient evolve soon. I hope this is not a wish unanswered.

Where do you stand on the iPhone and BlackBerry battle and has it worked out for you?

Android Phones in Canada: Why So Shy, Rogers?

Note: Shortly after this article was written, Telus added the HTC Hero to its stores, making it the second Canadian carrier to add an Android-powered phone.

One notable challenge in the Canadian wireless market is consumer expectation. Canadians can see new phones enter the marketplace south of the border and want them with comparable plans as soon as possible. When Rogers introduced the iPhone it discovered that pulling an (expensive) plan out of thin air for a product Canadians had waited on for months drew considerable ire – enough to force a limited time, low-cost 6 GB data plan. Everybody loves the iPhone, but it’s still far from the best for wireless cost reduction.

Rogers is approaching a similar watershed with phones powered by Google Android. Alone in offering phones powered by the operating system, the carrier has been able to mostly keep these offerings under the radar, but that’s about to change. Android 2.0 is a major update that promises iPhone-rivaling functionality and it’s linked to a high-profile hardware release: Motorola’s Droid smartphone. Even if Rogers doesn’t adopt the Droid (something that’s hard to imagine, considering it’s the only carrier with Android-powered phones at all) the phone has generated tremendous buzz for its OS, and Canadians are listening – they get the same ads, tech news and websites as Americans.

Fortunately for Rogers, Verizon’s Droid doesn’t have an iPhone’s style, or a special data plan – it’s billed the same as any other smartphone for comparable service – so chances are Canadians won’t have the same meltdown over Rogers’ onerous data prices. Naturally, the prices will still be ridiculous compared to the US market; most US Droid users will take advantage of a US$30 per month unlimited data plan while Rogers’ 5 GB plans – less than the typical “unlimited” ceiling in the US – cost CAN$80.

So Rogers may dodge iPhone rage, but they still have to contend with Canadian impatience at waiting for the Droid and other phones that are heavily advertised across the US. In this case, the company may be pursuing the right strategy by releasing Android-powered phones gradually, with a low profile. That seems to be the strategy behind adding the GW620 LG Eve to its catalog with minimal publicity, even though it’s a feather in the company’s cap – Rogers is the first North American carrier to offer it. One can only hope that a Rogers Android release comes with more hype – and inspired enough of a consumer backlash to inspire the company to offer an “appeasement” data plan, like it did for the iPhone.

Save on Data Costs with Tethering — While You Still Can

In Canada, Rogers is pushing its Rocket Stick wireless internet service pretty hard. But you won’t hear much about another service that could save you money while providing similar advantages. I’m talking about internet tethering.

Tethering is the act of using your mobile phone as a modem. This allows you to hook it up to a laptop so that you can take advantage of wireless high speed internet on the go, much as you would with an internet stick.That means that instead of having separate plans for your phone and internet stick (and paying for the internet stick on short term plans) you’d be able to take it all from one data plan . . . except that you can’t, because carriers don’t want you to.

Tethering capability is actually built into most Internet-ready wireless hardware, but carriers typically block, reduce or levy extra charges for this function.  Out of the big three Canadian carriers, Bell and Telus both charge outrageous overage on tethering no matter your data plan, as their conditions specifically exclude it.

Rogers does support tethering — but it sure looks like they don’t want to. Rogers data plans of 1 GB or greater either automatically support tethering, or can get it enabled with a phone call, but this only applies to data plans subscribed to from June 19, 2009 to December 31st of this year. That means if you want tethering you need to act now.

For GILL Technologies customers in Canada tethering is a simple two process. Just Call ClientCare to request Rogers’ tethering Add-On and we’ll set it up for you, along with any data plan you need. Next, call again or ask us to call you) and we’ll walk you through setting up tethering step by step.

Rogers’ New CEO Symbolizes the Power of Wireless

Ending persistent speculation about whether it would be him or the late Ted Rogers’ son, Edward, Nadir Mohamed officially took over as CEO of Rogers Communications on March 31st, 2009. Mr. Mohamed isn’t a well-known figure to the public at large, but people in the telecommunications industry know him well. From 2000 to 2005, he led Rogers Wireless, taking it from an annual loss of $36 million to a steady increase in profit, to the point where Rogers Wireless now reports net earnings of over $1 billion a year.

You can debate how much of this was the result of Rogers’ (and Mohamed’s) ingenuity versus how much was pure market penetration but either way you look at it, the results are clear: Wireless has evolved from a troubled acquisition into perhaps the single most influential division of the entire corporation. This trend is mirrored in other companies. BCE CEO George Cope took the helm in 2008 after coming into the industry via Clearnet and Telus. Wireless experience is obviously one of the central prerequisites to seizing the helm of any communications company.

What does this mean for the average Canadian wireless consumer? The man in charge of Rogers is one of the architects of the Canadian cellular industry – both the good and bad parts. Under Nadir Mohamed, Rogers committed to the 3G technology that positioned it to be Canada’s exclusive iPhone carrier, but it’s also a fact that under his watch, Rogers Wireless developed a strategy based on expensive cell phone plans known for particularly conservative caps on data usage. Indeed, analysts have predicted a “stay the course” strategy, where Rogers continues to command premium prices for its exclusive products and services while expanding its capabilities to keep a distinct niche.

Will this policy stand up to future stresses? The recession and the results of the Advanced Wireless Spectrum (AWS) auction will test Mr. Mohammed’s and Rogers’ position. If the former is the “short, sharp shock” that Canada’s government projects, it shouldn’t be much of a problem. On the other hand, new players powered by AWS acquisitions will have to compete with Rogers’ niche brands like Fido, but Rogers will have to deal with a customer base that it has alienated in several high profile incidents, such as its infamous iPhone rollout. New players in the industry will at least offer more choice, and that provides more opportunities for savings. So even if Rogers won’t change the policies that make it one of Canada’s pricier carriers, the future looks good for telecom expense management outcomes.