Setting up Wi-Fi at Home for your Blackberry

Have You Set-Up Your Wi-Fi at Home for Your Blackberry?

 

Most of us have wireless networks set up at home that allow us to connect our laptops, game systems and other Wi-Fi enabled devices to the Internet.

 Most newer models of BlackBerries have the ability to connect to Wi-Fi networks too (some capable models include the Curve 8520 & 9300, the Bold 9000 & 9700 series, and the Torch 9800),  however –  since most of us have data plans, what is the benefit of connecting to a Wi-Fi network at home? [Read more…]

How to turn off Data on a Blackberry

Avoid Blackberry Data Roaming Charges

Have you ever received high roaming charges while travelling internationally when you knew that you were being very careful? – You only sent 2 emails and had a plan that covered your voice usage!

 

Little did you know that having your data device turned on will incur data usage even if you are not doing anything. – Your Blackberry is still sending and receiving data whether you read or sent any emails. [Read more…]

Handsfree Options for Cellphones and Smartphones

Have you chosen your Handsfree Option?

While more and more areas are making talking/texting while driving illegal,  it is in good practice to not talk on your cell phone or text while driving.  

 

Lucky for us there are many options that allow us to still do what we need to do with our mobile devices while on the raod and still stay safe – Of course check your local laws for specific details –

 

Here are a few options: [Read more…]

10 Simple Steps to Blackberry Email Set Up to BIS Server

Blackberry Email Setup to BIS Server

Have you been given the frustrating task to set up blackberry email to a BIS Server or create a blackberry login? Have you been told by the carrier, that what was once available through their website, a channel to complete the setup, was no longer offered as Blackberry was no longer permitting the carrier to provide this. Whether we believe this or not, it certainly has caused allot of challenges for users.  The alternative for this, is setting up via the Blackberry itself, which can be challenging all on its own. So we cornered our ClientCare Team to give us the steps to make it happen in an easy step by step process. Below are 10 simple steps that as of this posting have seemed to do it for most users. Hope this helps.

 
How to set up email on Blackberry and create a Web Login from your Blackberry phone:

1. Push the Blackberry key to bring up the menu and go to Set up. Then Email Set up/ Email Accounts. It will connect to the service.
2. Read and agree to the Blackberry Service Agreement.
3. When it brings up the email options ( Yahoo, Gmail, etc. ) go to Other
4. Enter the Email and Password of your email account
      >You may get a message “ Invalid email address or Password. Verify your email address and password. If the error persists please contact…..” Hit  OK and it should bring up a link “ I will provide email settings”
5. Make sure the POP/IMAP option is hilighted, confirm the email address and password. Enter you email server ( get this from your IT Manager or email provider ) and the username for the server  then hit continue
6. The next screen should be a confirmation screen, saying that the set up is complete. You should start receiving emails on the phone.

 

not quite done though….
 
7. Return to the setup screen and got back in to the email setup up. You should see the email that you just set up. Hit the Blackberry key to bring up the full menu, then select “Create User name” . You will get a screen advising you that this is a permanent change and the steps required. Hit Continue.
8. This will bring up the login screen. Enter a user name and password
9. You will have to validate the email account by putting the email password in again. Once done you should get a screen saying that the password was successfully validated.
10. The email is now successfully set up and you can exit out of the set up screen. Take a break you’ve earned it!
 

Now for fun – watch the video – which has a mind blowing statistic at the end. We think you’ll like it. Enjoy and don’t forget to subscribe to our blog for weekly Tip of the Week Updates!

 

 

 

 

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Reverse 411 Phone Number Look Up Charges

EIiminate 411 Phone Number Look Up Charges

I can’t recall who, but someone (famously rich I believe) once said "count your pennies, and the dollars will take care of themselves". Truly great words, and frankly when we’re speaking of 411 charges, we’re not just talking pennies! In fact some cell phone companies charge as much as $2.50 per single 411 directory search. The sad part of all of this, is the information you get is limited (just the number) and is fully available for free if you tap into the right strategy based on your current plan and features.

 

Three Strategies to Eliminate or Reduce This Cost

 

In this video we discuss three separate strategies, which can either eliminate this cost or almost eliminate the cost depending on the strategy you deploy. As this week’s Tip of the Week, we would appreciate any comments you might have. If you have any topics you would like discussed in the future, just let us know in the comment box.

 

 

 

[Read more…]

Are You Getting the Best Internet Speed on Your Smartphone?

smartphone speed mobile management

Not all signal bars are created equal

Many people think their mobile device determines how fast their wireless Internet’s going to be. Phone manufacturers emphasize this by highlighting new hardware and software, such as the iPhone 3GS (according to Steve Jobs, the “S” stands for “Speed”). But your smartphone is only part of the equation when it comes to speedy web page loads and data transmission. If your company’s mobile management plan relies on high speed data transfer you need to consider what your phone will be able to do.

Your carrier’s network is the ultimate limit on data transfer speeds. A fast phone will still slow down on an older network.

How do networks and phones interact to determine your data transfer speed? We field questions about this every day. Let’s answer a few for you now.

Would the data on my Blackberry be slower than on an iPhone or Android phone?

Older Blackberries and phones are limited to slower networks, so if you’re on the second or third year of a contract you might be stuck with legacy technology such as the EDGE network. Newer Blackberries along with iPhones and Android handsets can use faster 3G networks such as Bell and Telus’ HSDPA, but there’s a catch: You need to be in range on the newer network.

In many areas you’ll be stuck with EDGE or other slower protocols, ultimately defaulting to basic GSM with no data access at all. New phones will still work, but at a reduced speed. Make sure you know your area’s coverage before you count on high transfer speeds.

What about Wi-Fi?

Some smartphones (including the iPhone – check the model of any phone you plan to get) can also connect to nearby Wi-Fi hot spots. Some carriers (such as Bell in Canada) operate Wi-Fi in busy areas. Otherwise, you can make use of Starbucks, home Wi-Fi, work Wi-Fi and other options. The great thing about Wi-Fi is that it doesn’t count as data transfer through your phone for billing purposes and it’s fast. The disadvantage is that older phones can’t connect through Wi-Fi, and it may not be available in all areas.

How can I tell what degree of coverage I have in my area?

First thing’s first: Ask carriers about their coverage in areas you plan on using your phone before you sign a contract! Once you have your phone out and about, the display will show what type of connection is available. This will normally display as follows:

3G: Indicates a 3G connection is available. This will only appear on 3G capable handsets.

EDGE: Indicates a slower EDGE (2G) connection is available.

edge (“lowercase edge”): Indicates only a GSM connection is available, with no data transfer.

Wi-Fi Symbol: The Wi-Fi symbol appears in Wi-Fi capable phones in range of a nearby network. You will be prompted to enter login information for any unfamiliar network. You can sometimes set up familiar networks (home, work) to connect automatically.

We hope this clears up some confusion and helps you find plans with the best data transfer speeds.

How to Fix Cell Phone Static With a New SIM Card

Mobile phone static can be caused by may factors,  including poor coverage area and issues with your handset. One often overlooked cause is the SIM card.

If you are experiencing issues with static on your cell phone try a new version of your SIM card before you either give up and purchase a new phone, or spend hours talking to Tech support.

If you’re a customer of Rogers Wireless in Canada, here’s how to identify the most up to date SIM card:

  • The newest Rogers SIM card version starts with 8930 2720 4000, followed by the next eight digits.
  • Older versions would be 8930 2720 3040 (xxxx xxxx) or 8930 2720 3030 (xxxx xxxx).

Checking to see if your SIM card’s causing static can save you hassle and expense down the road. Give it a try!

Cellular Expense Management for the Best Phone in the Universe

We here at GILL Technologies are excited at performing cellular expense management duties for the new pomegranate phone.* Click through the features (go through all of them!) to see why this phone goes above and beyond any previous high end mobile device on the market.

This is a great challenge for us because of the number of billing items a typical pomegranate phone will use. The average smartphone is all about a mix of minutes, texting, internet access and electronic pay per use features. With the pomegranate phone, we’ll have to be vigilant about additional translation languages, pay per view films and, of course, coffee sachets and shaving gel.

These line items will doubtless generate an epic number of billing errors and a number of extremely complicated plans – opportunities for us to find numerous ways to save our clients money, especially if they really like coffee.

* Yes, we know it’s a viral ad for Nova Scotia. But just imagine if it was real!

Eyeballing the Blackberry Bold – How Does it Stack Up Against the iPhone?

We’ve been blogging about the iPhone 3G a lot lately, and for good reason: Everyone working in telecom expense management will have to deal with its rigid plans and arcane activation procedures. But what’s really interesting is how the iPhone woke every other manufacturer up. They all know that people want stylish, high end smartphones now, and that they’ll go to considerable effort to get them.

The iPhone is branded as a smartphone and its features take aim at RIM’s Blackberry, so it’s fitting that RIM’s reacted with a product seemingly designed to attack the iPhone’s niche. It’s called the Blackberry Bold, or 9000 series.

The Bold is currently running in test markets, but a wide release is just around the corner. AT&T in the US and Rogers in Canada have both announced plans to carry it, leading to the big question: Which smartphone will get a better plan? Unfortunately, that’s not something we can reliably answer (yet), but what we can do is look at the 9000’s features and see how they compare to the iPhone’s.

Applications: The iPhone supports lots of snazzy Apple apps. They’re a real joy to use but let’s face it: There are times when you just need to get down to business. The Blackberry Bold lets you edit Word, Excel and Powerpoint documents. The winner? That depends on your agenda, but you’ll probably be more productive with a 9000 gracing your pocket.

Memory: The iPhone wins here, with 8 or 16 GB options. The Blackberry Bold has a respectable 1 GB, but can be expanded to 8 GB.

Media Toys: Both phones synch with iTunes. The Times review notes that the Bold’s screen is just as clear as the iPhone’s. Both of them feature 2 MP cameras, but while the iPhone’s great at organizing photos into nifty albums, we’re not sure if the 9000 will match it. Winner: iPhone, but only due to lack of evidence on the Bold’s part.

Email: The iPhone uses Activesynch technology to regularly request email right from your Exchange server. RIM operates its own network; Blackberries are virtually synonymous with this “push” approach. Although outages are an occasional problem, millions of users are satisfied with it. We’ve also heard anecdootal evidence that it’s just plain faster than iPhone, too. This is Blackberry’s edge; it wins.

Web: Both phones offer true HTML browsing but the iPhone uses Safari: the same browser used by Macs. I feel conflicted here; I know lots of people dig Safari but when I tried it, I was disappointed – but maybe that’s because Firefox is my usual browser, and it’s just so good. I’m withholding judgment here. Both phones are also capable of Wifi.

The iPhone is very, very cool. The Blackberry Bold might be cool, but it has to overcome the brand’s somewhat staid, business-oriented image. That sums up the whole challenge of the “iPhone niche.” This is a crossover market whose customers are looking for a mix of features and style. One thing that might resolve it is the state of this niche a year from now, when the Apple fan effect will fade, and a larger proportion of consumers will decide based on something more than Apple’s formidable brand.